J.M. Frey

And who am I now that I'm not who I was?

3,173 notes

americachavez:

marvel give me a short about sharon’s undercover time as a nurse/steve’s neighbor and that one time she had to fight off ninjas from steve’s apartment while he was like, making dinner and sitting alone reading obama’s biography

(via msaether)

Filed under Yes this please

776 notes

doubledigitalis:

bakerstreetbabes:

lyndsayfaye:

What would Effie Munro’s daughter Lucy from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Adventure of the Yellow Face” have looked like in adulthood?  And what would have happened to her?

The hard truth is that very few options existed in the 19th century for women of color, and almost none as regarded what we would today call a “career.”  Those who worked inside the home were most often domestics or cooks in other people’s households, or else did sewing, crafts, or laundry within their own homes. But Effie Munro’s daughter had tremendous advantages, so let’s consider rather further.  She had a well-traveled white mother who practically merited the term “adventuress,” one with her own money and prospects, and she had a white father pledged to love and protect her.  The family must have faced terrible social pressures, but they were strong and affluent and committed and brave.  So what might have become of her?

Marriage.  Well to do women seldom, let us remember, sought work at all.  One of the most likely lives Lucy would have found is marriage to a prosperous man of color—but remember, Effie married a black gentleman, and her new husband saw no issue with interracial marriage.  Therefore, provided the groom was suitably courageous, kind, and generally awesome, I have no problem believing Effie’s daughter could have married whomever she damn well pleased!

—Education.  Lucy came from two highly intelligent and resourceful parents, and ones with no fear of flouting social convention.  If Effie’s daughter developed an interest in the sciences or the humanities, she would most likely have used the knowledge for teaching, possibly even in a school dedicated to educating people of color.

—Small Business Ownership.  It was extremely uncommon for women to own their own businesses, but it was just barely possible.  Lucy had no need of her own income; however, if she had a love of hospitality, hats, printing, what have you, she could have owned a restaurant, millinery, or small press, for example.

The Arts.  Lucy must have experienced myriad disappointments and snobberies even growing up with such a badass parent and step-parent.  She would have a lot to express, and since money was no object, I personally like to think that she could have chosen to tell her story through music, painting, or some other medium.  This is my headcanon.

—Social Justice.  Times, they were hard in the 19th century, especially for people of color; it would come as no surprise to me if Lucy became a revolutionary, a crusader for civil rights during the early days of the suffragette movement—in fact, if she wasn’t a suffragette, I’ll eat my hat.

Whatever became of Lucy Munro, I hope she had a full and happy life.  Not only were her parents behind her, but so were Sherlock Holmes, John Watson, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself—a pretty formidable cheer team if I ever saw one.

Daily history dose. :)

This whole series has been really interesting, as race is rarely discussed within canonical Holmes. 

583 notes

tamorapierce:

uninhibitedandunrepentant:

cognitivedissonance:

The above document was sent to me by a male reader of my site who’s quite stunned by what he read. I’m not.

They’re fairly organized and are actively calling for articles and research to highlight just how oppressed they are:

"Cite sources that show Leigh Alexander’s EXTREME racism, misandry, and bias towards Intel’s largest consumer-level base (Gamers)… If you have an academic position, tenure, are part of a research group AND have an interest in contributing NEW PAPERS that go against the current Feminist Inquisition…"

Leigh Alexander wrote about the lack of diversity and the decline in gaming culture.

DiGRA = Digital Games Research Association.

We all know what consumer base they’re about as well.

But it’s all about ethics in journalism and research, right?

CC: agoodcartoon

Reasons why it is terrifying to be a feminist academic in videogames: This

GamerGate: their tactics.

These read like mission debriefs for the military.

On purpose, I’d guess, because so many video games are military-based and include such debriefs and mission parameters.

In setting out their “missions” this way, they are mimicking and regurgitating the construct of military games. They are **deliberately ** and knowingly making this terrorism “playable”, with winnable objectives.

My god.

85,154 notes

sufferingsappho:

currentgoddess:

fandomsandfeminism:

macabrefascination:

featheredfriend:

charminglyantiquated:

silly silly little comic

Ladies, gentlemen, and other gentlepeople: my girlfriend’s ‘silly little comic’

Oh my fucking gods this is perfect

This makes me smile 

dragon came from water not fire
woman rebelled to save other woman
other woman didn’t need saving and could hold her own
dragon wasn’t killed
political scams
interracial lesbian relationship
there is not one thing about this I don’t like. 10/10 fuck yeah

I just realized that she said she’s studying alternative cures for magical stasis. Magical stasis as in sleeping curses. She is researching how to rescue sleeping princesses without needing a bullshit True Love’s kiss because she knows how shitty it is to sit around waiting for some hero to rescue her.

Perfect comic is perfect

(via angeladellamuerta)

2 notes

It’s here! It’s out! It’s available!

The Dark Lord and the Seamstress

Once upon a time, oh yes,
so very long ago, 
there came to be a lovely girl, 
who came to learn to sew. 
And as it goes, fair listener, 
she learnt to sew so well,
 that even the Dark Lord himself 
learned of her talent down in Hell.

_ “The Dark Lord and the Seamstress” is an illustrated love story told in verse about the importance of looking beyond someone’s (poorly dressed) exterior and into their heart. Features a little trickery, a little romance, and a little bit of sartorial fun!_

*

Review by: Mystical Press on Oct. 19, 2014 :
5/5 Stars
What a fun and delightful book!!! The illustrations were lovely and the story in prose was just adorable! Okay…admittedly…I teared up a little. IT WAS CUTE, SO SUE ME! LOL Looking forward to more from this author.

*

Amazon | Kindle | Goodreads  | Smashwords

It’s here! It’s out! It’s available!

The Dark Lord and the Seamstress

Once upon a time, oh yes, so very long ago, there came to be a lovely girl, who came to learn to sew. And as it goes, fair listener, she learnt to sew so well, that even the Dark Lord himself learned of her talent down in Hell.

_ “The Dark Lord and the Seamstress” is an illustrated love story told in verse about the importance of looking beyond someone’s (poorly dressed) exterior and into their heart. Features a little trickery, a little romance, and a little bit of sartorial fun!_

*

Review by: Mystical Press on Oct. 19, 2014 :
5/5 Stars What a fun and delightful book!!! The illustrations were lovely and the story in prose was just adorable! Okay…admittedly…I teared up a little. IT WAS CUTE, SO SUE ME! LOL Looking forward to more from this author.

*

Amazon | Kindle | Goodreads | Smashwords

7 notes

Stop Hating on Slashficcers and Commenting on Girl’s Sexuality

The media tells me, as a woman, that my ultimate fantasy-come-true, the one thing I’m meant to hope, wish, and dream for is marriage. A husband, a kid, a house.

The media tells me, as a woman, that my own sexuality is passive, receptive, non-existent, small, less.

The media tells me, as a woman, that a man’s sexuality is the only one worth talking about, discussing, writing about, celebrating, medicating, supporting, and subsidizing.

The media tells me, as a woman, that only male characters are important, can be deep, emotional, interesting, complex, worth celebrating, worth breaking down and building up, worth studying and investigating.

The media tells me, as a woman, that women characters are shallow tropes, are created to die for mainpain, can be replaced every week, are not worth deepening and investigating and fleshing out.

So.

I do as I’m told.

When I want to write stories, I write about the kind of dreams I’m allowed to have: domestic, romantic, family and kids and fucking.

When I want to write stories, I write about the kind of people who I’m told are important: complexly created and portrayed men.

When I want to write stories, I write about the sexuality that I’m allowed to celebrate: male sexuality - aggressive, encompassing, important, vital, center stage.

And.

And then.

And then the media tells me that slash fanfic is silly, small, absurd, gross, offensive, wrong, wrong, wrong.

Well.

FUCK YOU, then.

I’m only doing what you told me.

Filed under lustful cock monster annoyed

99 notes

scifrey:

Why are there six copies of “Mein Kampf” in my box of kids picture books?

CreateSpace? Are you drunk?

Update! 1) Tumblr’s hivemind has told me the language is Swedish. So, thank you! 2) CreateSpace has apologized for sending the books, offered to reimburse the COD customs charge I had to pay for the box, and has said I can dispose of the books as I please.

Right.

303,699 notes

How the Logic of "Friendzoning" Would Work If Applied in Other Instances:

*Man walks into a store and finds employee*
Man:
Alright, I've had enough. Why haven't you guys hired me?!
Employee:
Uh...well sir, when did you put in your application?
Man:
I never filled out an application.
Employee:
Well sir, we can't consider you for employment if you've never filled out an application.
Man:
No, that's bullshit, because I've been coming here for years now, and every single time I tell you all how much I love this store and how much I appreciate your customer service, unlike some of your other customers might I add!
Employee:
Well, but that doesn't-
Man:
AND I even told you that I didn't have a job!
Employee:
But sir, that doesn't indicate to us that you would like a job at our store. And again, if you've never filled out an application, we can't consider you. Besides, we're not hiring.
Man:
OH! Not hiring, HA! What a laugh. I see your store go through seasonal workers all the time. They come and go like nothing, but you won't consider me as a part-time employee even though I KNOW you've been looking for workers to fill positions? That's insane!
Employee:
Sir, we've been looking to hire a few people for management positions. Do you have any management experience?
Man:
Well no, but what does that matter?
Employee:
...Well sir, that's what we're looking for. You won't be suitable for the position without management experience.
Man:
Oh that's such a load of crap. You know, you'll be waiting around a long time for a manager if you don't lower your standards a little. Who cares if someone knows how to manage a store? I LOVE this store and I'm willing to work here, that's all that should matter to you.
Employee:
That...doesn't make any sense.
Man:
NO! I'm done. This is over. From now on, no more Mr. Nice Guy.
Employee:
Man:
Employee:
Man:
Fuck you, slut.

130,458 notes

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

(via msaether)